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KokoS
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   Posted 8/8/2008 7:35 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
I found out I have an AVM in my front left temporal lobe about a year and a half ago. My neurologist believes I was born with this. I have not experienced any problems with the AVM and my dr said it is small. In one mri it was never reported, in two others it was. He told me to just go on with life as usual and just to monitor it each year with an mri. I am 47, in good health with the exception of tinnitus in my right ear which I have for 4 1/2 years and I get ice pick headaches. Those are only about one every month or so, but I do get migraine headaches a few times a month. I generally just take tylenol since my dr said to stay away from advil or excederin since they are blood thinners. My question is what conditions require an AVM to be treated? Is there any activities that I should not be doing? I am very active, doing kayaking, cardio exercising about 4 times a week, pilates and scuba diving. Diving was the only concern my dr had and I do not dive past 30-40 ft. I did not see any posting about sport activities and AVMs. Can stress from exercising cause the AVM to bleed?
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radsrus
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   Posted 8/9/2008 4:31 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
It might be worth your while to see a very good diving medicine specialist about diving. I am a diver and can't think of any reason why diving would be a particularly bad thing with AVM, but I'm not a diving medicine expert.

In general, small asymptomatic AVM's that have not bled can be watched. The risk of a bleed is relatively small in patients without higher risk factors. The higher risk factors include previous bleed, deep-seated lesions, and exclusive deep venous drainage. If you don't have those, your risk of a bleed is probably 1% per year or less, but if you have all three it can be as much as 30% or more. It sounds like you are in the low risk group, but your doctors can tell you for sure.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org

Mail to:
Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave. #101
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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radsrus
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   Posted 8/9/2008 4:32 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
By the way, the fact that you don't go below 40 feet is probably not that important, since, as you know, the biggest pressure changes are in the first 30 feet.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org

Mail to:
Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave. #101
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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KokoS
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Date Joined Aug 2008
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   Posted 8/9/2008 5:09 PM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Thanks for the response. I do not have any of the high risk factors that you indicated. So I do believe I am in the low risk category, and hopefully I will stay there.

As for the diving, my dr is concerned that if I am on a deep dive and something should occur with the avm and I need to surface quickly at a deep depth I would not be able to since I would need to decompress and make safety stops on the way up. If I am diving at a depth where I would be able to ascend quickly if something should happen I would be able to. I think my chances of something happening are probably slim, but there is always the off chance that something could and maybe being 80 feet under water might not be the best place to be. I am ok with it for now and I can always reconsider next summer doing a deep dive.
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radsrus
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Email Address Not AvailablePersonal Homepage Not AvailablePrivate Messaging Not AvailableAIM Not AvailableICQ Not AvailableY! Not AvailableMSN Not Available
Date Joined Jul 2004
Total Posts : 7510
 
   Posted 8/10/2008 4:25 AM (GMT -8)    Quote This PostAlert An Admin About This Post.
Even from 40 feet a safety stop is important, so I guess there are risks in any case. On the other hand, if you love diving as much as I do, the rtisk maybe worthwhile. I think it is quite small in any case. You have been diving for years I presume, and have had the AVM all that time.


Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
St. Anthony Hospital Cyberknife Center
(405) 272-7311
buddy@swrads.org

Mail to:
Clinton A. Medbery, III, M.D.
Southwest Radiation Oncology
1011 N. Dewey Ave. #101
Oklahoma City, OK 73102

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